The Economy of Creativity

I have always dreamed I would one day have a substantial income from my creative work, but I am well aware of the reasons that creatives have been called starving artists throughout history.

A creative, whether working in music, film, photography, paint, poetry, other written forms must spend an enormous amount to acquire education, materials to ply the craft, tools, and books that enable self-teaching which are often more expensive than average books.

Once the skill is honed, one finds there is an immense amount of competition for a limited number of positions. Generally, only those who exhibit extraordinary genius achieve successful careers and commissions.

If a creative overcomes these obstacles, a monumental one remains; the consumer problem. In music, film, theater, art, beading, pottery, photography, periodicals, journalism, fiction, poetry, non-fiction, sculpture, anything creative, many consumers have the mindset that these works should be free. The time, practice, education, material investment, tools, and effort that go into something beautiful and desirable are discounted to no worth by a vast majority.

Some of this attitude is because a creative is seen as having a more enjoyable occupation, so we do not really work. Many people have little idea how much effort goes into what they have before them. The finished product is magic to them. As liberal arts are cut out of public education, this will only worsen. Creative production can so effect society that its promotion should be encouraged.

Sometimes creatives can be blind to the worth of other’s work as well. Respect is something we should all cultivate. It is needed everywhere.

When something is shared without permission or credit; when pirated work is viewed, read, listened to; when licenses are shared these things make it harder to make a survivable living creatively. When the free views are repeatedly used, but the subscription is never purchased; when one is willing to profit handsomely from another’s work but unwilling to pay fair compensation; all these and more foster attitudes that cheapen creative work, so the economy tends to reward creatives less as time goes by.

DSC_0120

I have abided in
Shadowlands tried by neglect,
Fear, lack, shame, trouble,
Far too long, and I will now,
With God’s help, be He willing,
Step out of this thick darkness
And be wrapped in love, light,
That all may know the Lord works
To the good of His children.

Today, I am grateful:

  1.   I can listen to great music as I work.
  2.   I have technology that allows me to work magic.
  3.   I was able to get the overcooked pot clean.
  4.   I went to the fellowship meal and prayer meeting last night.
  5.   Libraries have interesting books.
  6.   I am able to think clearly and express myself coherently.
  7.   I am still alive and mostly well.

If you need a prompt, look at the picture above and create something. Also, you could explore what you feel compromises those of us who work creatively.

Thank you for visiting Haphazard Creative. I hope you found something interesting or inspiring here. Never forget you have something significant and unique to share with a world that needs your perspective. I hope you will click the follow button, if not, please visit again. God be with you in all you endeavor to do and in every place you go.

© Jo Ann J. A. Jordan

2 comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s