The Out Option

For some time, there has been speculation about what it would be like to leave Facebook. I have long felt I contributed much more than I gained, making the proposition much less than profitable in a relational way.

I deactivated my account a week ago and have also abandoned Twitter and Instagram. A lot of consideration went into these actions. It was not the choice of a moment.

The time I have gained is tremendous. I am not subject to the harmful material posted by others and have freedom from politics—more than that, the bombardment from advertising is gone.

All my social media has come to seem frivolous, and of little value, so I temporarily quit. Whether I go back is to be seen.

I joined the social networks to build a creative platform, and none of it seems applicable in that regard. The freedom from the tyranny of having to participate and the quantity of time I recovered are strong incentives to opt out permanently.

So, I am reporting from the outside, and the scenery looks gorgeous.

© Jo Ann J. A. Jordan

Reading List

Wild Lands (Book 2 of Savage Lands) by Stacey Marie Brown, 297 pages, Five Stars.

The Art of Prompt by Camerson Monhagan, uncertain page count, 2500 prompts, Five Stars.

The above are my final reads in March.

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April 2021 – 12 Books

Shaman by Kim Stanley Robinson, 460 pages, Five Stars; I have read several books by this author, and all are wonderful.

The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins, 390 pages, Five Stars; I like stories about books, libraries, and strange things.

Darke by Rick Gekoski, 321 pages, Four Stars, deals with grief and isolation and is well done, a bit dark and depressing.

Reincarnation Blues by Michael Poore, 376 pages, Five Stars, you should read this; it is a romp.

A Witch In Time by Constance Sayers, 449 pages, Five Stars, is a story that invites deep thought.

The Secret Life of Books by Tom Mole, 239 pages, Five Stars, explores how books mean more than just what they say.

Tears of Amber by Sofia Segovia, Kindle First Read, 487 pages, Five Stars; is a story of how a family survives a war.

D (A Tale of Two Worlds) by Michel Faber, 304 pages, Five Stars, a story of what might happen if someone made a letter of the alphabet disappear.

Unexpected by Jozua van Otterloo, 100 pages, Four Stars, an inspirational book, I would give Three Stars because it has many errors and I copy edit. However, the stories and references are very appropriate.

The Abundance by Annie Dillard, 288 pages, Five Stars, everything I have read by her is grand.

The Discomfort of Evening by Marieke Lucas Rijneveld, 298 pages, Five Stars, is another story about grief, how we blame ourselves and involve others in attempted resolution. Booker Prize Winner

Ilium by Dan Simmons, 752 pages, Ten Stars, I mean, Five Stars, I love this author. I read Drood, Flashback, Black Hills, and I will read others. I think he is not as well recognized as he should be. His Horror is bone-chilling, his Syfy is riveting, his writing is literary and superb.

© Jo Ann J. A. Jordan

Diversity Enriches Normality

© Jo Ann J. A. Jordan

Whatever could it
Be, coming such great surprise,
From lands far away
To please fancy fantasy,
Developed in happy times?
The container gives
No clue but from whence it came,
And useless guessing
For almost anything might
Signify the producer.
Jewelry, toys, clothes,
At affordable prices,
Tools, appliances,
Fill needs temporarily
Providing a range of choice.
Without such shipping
Many would go without items,
Enriching bare days
Of impoverishment, lack,
Better being than nothing.

© Jo Ann J. A. Jordan

As a prompt, take a photograph or create a visual work of art and write something relating to your image or artwork.

A 365 Creativity Project seems daunting initially, and even later, there are times quitting might be more manageable. I did this before with a sizable increase in my creative output than if I did not commit to it. 2020 was a good year in this regard. If you want to produce more work, I recommend building an achievable goal and holding yourself to it.

I am grateful:

I have electronic devices.
It was a dry day.
Sam’s Club cooks chicken.
Music lifts spirits and inspires.
Clothes protect and conceal us.

I am still working on the site, watch out for the yellow tape.

Thank you for visiting Haphazard Creative. Please follow the site, or come back when you may. If you have thoughts you would like to share, they are welcome.

© Jo Ann J. A. Jordan

Spooky Recommendations

It is nearing the end of October, and it does not seem right that I would not mention a few spooky reads. I like a lot of SciFi, Fantasy, and the occasional dose of Horror. Really, I think 2020 has been a ride worthy of Washington Irving, but getting to the books…

The Animals At Lockwood Manor by Jane Healy is full of strangeness. What if a museum located to your home? I read this on Kindle, but due to tech problems, I am not linking at this time.

The Haunting of H.G. Wells by Robert Masello, if you can pass on that title you are a more substantial sort than I am. I thoroughly enjoyed this on Kindle.

Elsewhere by Dean Koontz, first, understand I adore his stories. If you have not read him, this an excellent place to begin. It is on Kindle Unlimited and is a trip elsewhere.

Usher’s Passing by Robert R. McCammon, what would the Halloween season be without something either by or inspired by the incomparable Poe. If you grew up on tales macabre, you know why this is here. Plus, Robert is someone to read in Horror.

I am using my tablet with a keyboard, not having yet resolved my issues. Still, I could not pass up a chance to share a few five-star reads with you all.

May you stay safe and find the enjoyment in those things you encounter. Thanks for spending a few moments here.

© Jo Ann J. A. Jordan

The Living Dead

Dateline: Tuesday, September 8, 2020

Filing Review: The Living Dead by George A. Romero & Daniel Kraus

First, I do not do zombies. I did watch some of Romero’s films from 1979 to 1981. Since then, I have entirely avoided the genre. My take on zombies, terrifying creatures I refused to admit had existence, believing that would allow me safety. I know, ostrich, I can run with the birds.

I went to the library a few weeks ago and found this new release. I mused perhaps it was time I let an expert better familiarize me with ghouls. 

This book defied my expectations. It did not scare me with the monsters but with the degeneracy of some of the human characters. This book is a significant comment on humanity and so timely in coming out in the pandemic.

It is one of the very best books I have read in recent times. The final chapters were so unbelievably well-done that I was in tears for many pages. 

I do not think a five-star rating does this book justice. Go ahead, indulge me, and let me say it is a ten. You should read it. I highly recommend it. It is a bit long, though, maybe plunge into it over a couple of weekends.

A full-post review, you know I loved it.

© Jo Ann J. A. Jordan